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Engaging Juvenile Justice System-Involved Families

June 27, 2014
 Antoinette Davis 
 Angela  Irvine 
 Jason Ziedenberg 

Families of justice-system involved youth have traditionally been excluded from decisions regarding their children and often are assumed to be the cause of their children’s criminal activity. In this final publication of an eight-part series detailing NCCD’s study of youth deincarceration trends in the United States, study respondents acknowledge that families are a key component to supervision strategies and improved outcomes for their youth. The complete series of reports can be found here. Watch for the addition of a ninth piece, containing notes and resources, in the near future.


June 16, 2014
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

Find a recap of the NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families and announcements regarding a new Pay for Success partnership and NCCD's new office in Washington, DC, in the June 2014 issue of the NCCD newsletter. This issue also introduces one of our new staff members, Angela Fitzgerald; includes information about a few of NCCD's exciting new projects; and links to NCCD's most recent blog posts.  *Note that this link opens slowly, please be patient. 

Robert Lewis Jr. Keynote Speech at the NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families

June 13, 2014
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

Father Gregory Boyle Plenary Speech at the NCCD Conference on Children, Youth, and Families

June 13, 2014
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

2014 Summer Webinar – Cognitive Predictors of Self-Care Abilities in APS Clients Referred for a Capacity Assessment

June 12, 2014
 Moderated by  Andrew Capehart, NAPSA 

Jason E. Schillerstrom, MD, presented a discussion on the relationship between different cognitive domains (memory, visuospatial function, and executive function) and self-care abilities. The webinar specifically highlights the relationship between executive function and money management ability. Many state legal definitions of capacity are in part dependent on a person's ability to provide care for themselves. Persons unable to provide care for themselves because of a physical or mental condition often meet the definition for incapacity. However, when working with elders, there is often an assumption that cognitive deficits, such as memory impairment, are responsible for the disability.  (Materials: slide presentation)

Close to Home: Strategies to Place Young People in Their Communities

May 28, 2014
 Antoinette Davis 
 Angela Irvine 
 Jason Ziedenberg 

Removing juvenile justice system-involved youth from their homes and communities often impacts their futures negatively: Critical links to families and other supportive adults are broken, making reentry more difficult. Youth placed far from home are more likely to reoffend and less likely to reconnect to school and work. In this report, one in an eight-part series, NCCD looks at placement strategies to keep more youth close to home. 

Supervision Strategies for Justice-Involved Youth

May 6, 2014
 Antoinette Davis 
 Angela Irvine 
 Jason Ziedenberg 

Hundreds of thousands of youth cycle in and out of local and state juvenile justice systems each year, often for minor offenses and technical violations. According to juvenile justice stakeholders interviewed by NCCD, far too many of these low- to moderate-risk youth are unnecessarily entangled in juvenile justice systems when more effective ways to supervise these youth exist. This report includes information on many of the new and innovative methods and programs for supervising justice-involved youth that juvenile justice stakeholders are exploring and implementing.

Stakeholders’ Views on the Movement to Reduce Youth Incarceration

April 15, 2014
 Antoinette Davis 
 Angela Irvine 
 Jason Ziedenberg 

For its study regarding the dramatic reduction of youth incarceration rates in most US states, NCCD interviewed key stakeholders for their opinions about these changes. This report highlights what stakeholders see as legislative successes and remaining challenges, along with sharing their recommendations for furthering the deincarceration trend. This publication is part of an eight-part series of information sheets and reports. The complete series, along with a ninth piece containing notes and resources, can be found here.

2014 Spring Webinar – An Overview of the Assessment of Everyday Decision Making (ACED)

April 14, 2014
 Moderated by Kathy Park 

Jason Karlawish, MD, provides an overview of the development and use of the Assessment of Capacity for Everyday Decision-Making (ACED). The ACED is the first tool available with data supporting its reliability and validity to effectively address a common clinical issue: is a patient who refuses an intervention to help manage an instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) disability capable of making this decision? The ACED is useful for assessing the capacity to solve functional problems of older persons with mild to moderate cognitive impairment from disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. Common clinical scenarios are the person who has problems performing an IADL, such as cooking, but refuses help to manage that IADL. Is the person capable of refusing this help? The ACED provides patient specific assessments of decisional abilities needed to make that informed refusal. The ACED works well for persons with short term memory impairments since the provided summary sheet can be referred to throughout the interview. The ACED can also help in real-world assessment of a person's cognitive abilities. It can also inform the assessment of complex cases of the "self-neglect syndrome." The ACED interview takes 15-20 minutes to administer. At the close of an ACED interview, the interviewer has a set of data that describe the person's performance on the decision making abilities. (Materials: slide presentation)

The Structured Decision Making® (SDM) System: Fact Vs. Fiction

April 8, 2014
 National Council on Crime and Delinquency   

This brief outlines common misperceptions about the research-based Structured Decision Making® (SDM) system and offers concise, correct information. We invite you to call us at (800) 306-6223 to talk with an NCCD Children's Research Center staff person about the SDM system.